How To Protect Your Business From SHTML Phishing

Thomas Fox is president of Tech Experts, southeast Michigan’s leading small business computer support company.

Data security is vital to any business. Learn how SHTML phishing works and how to minimize the risk of your data falling into the hands of attackers.

Email phishing has been in the playbook of hackers since, well, email. What’s alarming is the scope in which criminals can conduct these attacks, the amount of data potentially at risk, and how vulnerable many businesses are to phishing attempts.

Here’s what you need to know to spot the hook and protect your data from being reeled in.

How Does Email Phishing Work?
A phishing email typically contains an attachment in the form of a server-parsed HTML (SHTML) file.

When opened, these shady files redirect the user to a malicious website often disguised as a legitimate product or service provider. [Read more…]

Top Concern For Small Businesses? Cybersecurity

Thomas Fox is president of Tech Experts, southeast Michigan’s leading small business computer support company.

While some might assume that fear of an economic recession would be at the top of the list of key issues small business owners concern themselves with, a recent survey found that another issue is of much greater concern: Cybersecurity.

This is no surprise.

For the past several years, cybercrimes and data breaches among companies large and small, governments, and even individual citizens have risen drastically.

While it’s true that many business owners still assume a data breach at their own company is highly unlikely, with the ultimate price tag of such attacks ramping up to the millions of dollars (and recovery being hardly successful), it makes sense that companies are taking notice.
[Read more…]

How To Save Your Business From Phishing Scams

Workplaces today are filled with computers and machines, but just as these workstations optimize efficiency and profit, they also increase the possibility of attacks designed to steal, destroy, or corrupt your data through the use of malicious programs.

The most probable avenue for these malicious programs is through phishing scams. To understand how to stop these attacks, you must first understand what a phishing scam entails.

A phishing scam is an attempt for someone to steal sensitive information or install malware onto your PC by tricking you into clicking a link, opening an attachment, or providing personal information.

Although these attacks use tactics that trick people every day, you can stay safe by staying smart. Through time and practice, it can become easy to spot a phishing attack and keep your PC and personal information safe.

If you receive an email containing a threatening message, usually one demanding immediate action, it is probably a phishing scam. Most of these messages try to trick users into clicking a link or opening an attachment with threatening messages like, “Your account has been compromised! You are no longer protected! Click here to protect your account!”

Once you click the link, though, you are redirected to a phishing site.

Another example may be what seems to be an email from your boss’ boss demanding sensitive information to complete company documentation. Always beware when you see a threatening or demanding message.

Another indicator of a phishing scam is an unfamiliar email address or domain name. Some scammers may use domain names or email addresses similar to your normal contacts, but they will never be the same. If you notice an inconsistency, report the email.

Phishing scams can also normally be identified by the sender’s grammar skills. Here is an example from a phishing email: “Click here to cancel this request, else your öffice 365 accöunt…” Terrible grammar and unfamiliar characters as shown here are indicators of a scam.

Lastly, be wary of any request for any type of personal or sensitive information whatsoever, even if it initially seems to be from a trustworthy source.

Even if it does not show any other signs of being a phishing scam, always double and triple-check the authenticity of the request.

If you do stumble across a phishing scam, your best course of action would be to delete the email in question without opening any attachments or clicking any links.

In addition, you should report the incident to your superior or your IT service provider. If a phishing attack happened to you, it can happen to your coworkers as well.

Giving sensitive company information away to a scammer is the last way you want to start your week.

Their tactics are always changing, so the best way to fight attacks like these is through education and awareness rather than programs or filters. Remember the red flags of a phishing scam, and you will have no problem keeping your business safe and secure.

What Are The Newest Phishing Attacks?

Thomas Fox is president of Tech Experts, southeast Michigan’s leading small business computer support company.

Phishing is a term adapted from the word “fishing.” When we go fishing, we put a line in the water with bait on it, and we sit back and wait for the fish to come along and take the bait. Maybe the fish was hungry. Perhaps it just wasn’t paying attention. At any rate, eventually a fish will bite, and you’ll have something delicious for dinner.

How Does Phishing Work?
This is essentially how cyber phishing works. Cybercriminals create an interesting email, maybe saying that you’ve won a $100 gift certificate from Amazon. Sound too good to be true? Find out! All you have to do is click the link and take a short survey.

Once you click the link, a virus is downloaded onto your system. Sometimes it’s malware, and sometimes it’s ransomware. Malware includes Trojans, worms, spyware, and adware. These malicious programs each have different goals, but all are destructive and aimed at harming your computers. [Read more…]

New Whaling Schemes: CEO Fraud Continues To Grow

In previous years, the first clue that your corporate email has been compromised would be a poorly-spelled and grammatically incorrect email message asking you to send thousands of dollars overseas.

While annoying, it was pretty easy to train staff members to see these as fraud and report the emails. Today’s cybercriminals are much more tech-savvy and sophisticated in their messaging, sending emails that purport to be from top executives in your organization, making a seemingly-reasonable request for you to transfer funds to them as they travel.

It’s much more likely that well-meaning financial managers will bite at this phishing scheme, making CEO and CFO fraud one of the fastest-growing ways for cybercriminals to defraud organizations of thousands of dollars at a time.

Here’s how to spot these so-called whaling schemes that target the “big fish” at an organization using social engineering and other advanced targeting mechanisms.

What Are Whaling Attacks?

Phishing emails are often a bit more basic, in that they may be targeted to any individual in the organization and ask for a limited amount of funds.

Whaling emails, on the other hand, are definitely going for the big haul, as they attempt to spoof the email address of the sender and aim pointed attacks based on information gathered from LinkedIn, corporate websites and social media.

This more sophisticated type of attack is more likely to trick people into wiring funds or passing along PII (Personally Identifiable Information) that can then be sold on the black market. Few industries are safe from this type of cyberattack, while larger and geographically dispersed organizations are more likely to become easy targets.

The Dangers of Whaling Emails

What is particularly troubling about this type of email is that they show an intimate knowledge of your organization and your operating principles. This could include everything from targeting exactly the individual who is most likely to respond to a financial request from their CEO to compromising the legitimate email accounts of your organization.

You may think that a reasonably alert finance or accounting manager would be able to see through this type of request, but the level of sophistication involved in these emails continues to grow. Scammers include insider information to make the emails look even more realistic, especially for globe-trotting CEOs who regularly need an infusion of cash from the home office.

According to Kaspersky, no one is really safe from these attacks — even the famed toy maker Mattel fell to the tactics of a fraudster to the tune of $3 million. The Snapchat human resources department also fell prey to scammers, only they were after personal information on current and past employees.

How Do You Protect Your Organization From Advanced Phishing Attacks?

The primary method of protection is ongoing education of staff at all levels of the organization. Some phishing or whaling attacks are easier to interpret than others and could include simple cues that something isn’t quite right. Here are some ways that you can potentially avoid phishing attacks:

  • Train staff to be on the lookout for fake (spoofed) email addresses or names. Show individuals how to hover over the email address and look closely to ensure that the domain name is spelled correctly.
  • Encourage individuals in a position of leadership to limit their social media presence and avoid sharing personal information online such as anniversaries, birthdays, promotions and relationships — all information that can be leveraged to add sophistication to an attack.
  • Deploy anti-phishing software that includes options such as link validation and URL screening.
  • Create internal best practices that include a secondary level of validation when large sums of money or sensitive information is requested. This can be as simple as a phone call to a company-owned phone to validate that the request is legitimate.
  • Request that your technology department or managed services provider add a flag to all emails that come from outside your corporate domain. That way, users can be trained to be wary of anything that appears to be internal to the organization, yet has that “external” flag.

There are no hard and fast rules that guarantee your organization will not be the victim of a phishing attack. However, ongoing education and strict security processes and procedures are two of the best ways to help keep your company’s finances — and personal information — safe from cyberattack.

Inside The Anatomy Of The Human Firewall

Thomas Fox is president of Tech Experts, southeast Michigan’s leading small business computer support company.

Each year, around 61% of small businesses become the victims of a malware attack. While many small businesses may think no one would ever come after them because of their size, know that over half of the total global attacks hit small businesses and, for thieves, getting access to your systems is becoming increasingly lucrative.

Companies collect more about customers than ever before: medical history, financial records, consumer preferences, payment information, and other confidential information.

Some of this information could be used in malicious ways to either harm your business or directly harm the customers, so we all understand that we must protect it from cyberattacks.

Creating a human firewall is the best way to keep your system and data safe, but what exactly is a human firewall, why do you need one, and how can you build one? Let’s take a look! [Read more…]

Researchers Turning To Algorithms To Combat Phishing

Chris Myers is a field service technician for Tech Experts.

Phishing is a type of social engineering attack used to steal user information such as login credentials, bank account information, or credit card numbers. The most commonly seen phishing attack is when an attacker, posing as a legitimate source, tricks a victim into clicking on a malicious link in an email. Once clicked, the link installs malware on the user’s computer and possibly gives the attacker access to other devices on the same network.

Often, the link opens a website owned by the attacker, specifically designed to look like a normal login or account validation page. However, when users enter their information into this website, all they are doing is giving that information directly to the attacker.

Phishing emails have been around since the dawn of the Internet, even having a paper and presentation discussing their use at the 1987 conference for the International HP Users Group, “Interex.”

While the basic premise hasn’t changed since then, attackers have had decades to improve their technique and automated delivery systems.

A New Defense
Jeremy Richards of the mobile device security company Lookout has been developing a novel solution to this problem. Lookout records the network traffic of over 60 million mobile applications and, as such, has a large amount of real-time data it can analyze.

After manually tracking phishing websites through this network, Richards discovered many telltale digital signs of phishing websites. He started creating tools to assist in this detection, but those quickly evolved into their own automated search engine.

The program now goes through several steps to algorithmically narrow down and positively identify malicious websites. For example, the program will check new domains (website addresses) for misspellings of technology or financial companies, or special characters used in place of normal lettering.

Once it spots a suspicious website, it will take a screenshot of the homepage and then automatically search for the logos of thousands of companies. Phishing websites almost always try to look official by using the actual logos from companies like Apple, Microsoft, and Google.

Once a site is confirmed to be malicious, Lookout can report them to the authorities, download the specific phishing code used by the attackers, then look for that code in future scans to find additional websites.

As phishing attacks occur with increasing frequency, these automated solutions will be necessary for us to stand any chance at stemming the tide of cybercrime.

How To Spot Phishing Emails
Here are some common characteristics of phishing emails that you can identify:

Poor grammar – Since most emails aren’t composed by native English speakers, they usually contain many grammar, spelling, and capitalization mistakes, along with unusual phrasing.

Generic or informal greetings – If a message doesn’t address you by name, it’s another sign that it is from an unknown attacker.

Sense of urgency – Most phishing emails want you to rush through the message and click on a link without looking at it too closely.

Hyperlinks – Hover over any links to make sure they go where they say they are going.

Attachments – Many phishing emails will include malware in attachments.

Unusual sender – If it’s from someone you don’t know, pay extra attention to the contents.

Google Study Reveals Phishing Attacks Are The Biggest Threat To Web Security

A recent study by Google and UC Berkeley suggests that cyber thieves are successfully stealing 250,000 valid usernames and passwords every week.

The study, which was based on 12 months of login and account data that was found on criminal websites and forums, aimed to ascertain how the data had been hacked and the actions that can be employed to avoid criminal activity in the future.

Google claims the research is vital for developing an understanding of how people fall victim to scammers and hackers and will help to secure online accounts.

The research found that, over a 12-month period, keyloggers (programs that monitor every keystroke that someone make on a computer) stole 788,000 account credentials, 12 million were harvested via phishing (emails or phone calls that con people into handing over confidential data), and an incredible 1.9 billion were from breaches of company data. The study found the most productive attacks for cyber-thieves came from phishing and keylogging. In fact, in 12%-15% of cases, the fraudsters even obtained users’ passwords.

Malicious hackers had the most success with phishing and were able to pick up about 234,000 valid usernames and passwords every week, followed by keyloggers who managed to steal 15,000 valid account details per week.

Hackers will also look to gather additional data that could be useful in breaching security measures, such as the user’s Internet address (IP), the device being used (Android versus Apple) and the physical location. Gathering this data, however, proved far harder for those with malign intent.

Of the people whose credentials were secured, only 3.8% also had their IP address identified, and less than 0.001% had their detailed device information compromised.

Google said in a follow-up blog post that the research would be used to improve the way it detects and blocks attempts to misappropriate accounts.

Historical data of the physical location where users logged on and the devices they used will increasingly be used as part of a range of resources that users can use to secure their accounts.

The research, however, did acknowledge that the account hacking problem was ‘multi-pronged’ and would require countermeasures across a number of areas including corporate networks.

Education of users is set to become a ‘major initiative’ as the research also revealed that only 3.1% of people whose account had been hijacked subsequently started using enhanced security measures such as two-step authentication (Google authenticator or a similar service) after control of a stolen account was regained.

Gone Phishing! How To Spot A Phishing Scam

If you are a user that has been around for a while, there is a pretty good chance you’ve been targeted with a phishing scam. You may have a long lost relative in another country who left you millions – and all the executor of the estate needs is your banking information to send you your inheritance! Or a prince of a small country is trying to move some of his fortune and escape to America – and if you can help, you will be rewarded!

These are some oldies-but-goodies, however phishing scams have and will continue to get better and smarter.

There was a time when phishing scams almost always came filled with poor grammar, spelling errors, and writing that just seemed a little off. While these still exist, things have become harder to detect.

These scammers are always looking for your personal information. There are a few ways they can do this, but most of them begin with email spoofing, where a sender will mask their actual email address with a familiar one.

If it isn’t a spoofed email, it may come from an address that is very close to that of a known and trusted sender. This could have an extra letter or even just a period to try to trick you into completing whatever task they are using in an attempt to get your information. This could be something as simple as a link to “family photo” or video and it could very well open your system to different vulnerabilities.

Something like a keylogger, a program that tracks your keystrokes, can be almost undetected while also gathering your online banking or credit card information.

Lately, phishers and scammers have pulled out all the stops. There have been cases where phishers will not only spoof an email, but also documents. These can look pretty real, so take a close look.

A new long-shot, big-payoff scam is to spoof an email address of a financial institution to try to intercept money from home purchases. This is done with forged documents and a fake email. While it’s a long shot for something that big to happen, do big business in-person or through trusted secure communications.

What to watch for:

When you have email communication from a known sender that doesn’t quite add up (or doesn’t sound like them), don’t assume they’re just having an off day. One example: if you know your family member shares all of their photos on Facebook, would they really email you a link with little to no writing in the email?

Any “company” asking for any personal information or passwords through email should also raise red flags. While this might seem obvious if the email address doesn’t match, a spoofed email address can make this trick easier to fall victim to.

Also, be wary of anyone asking for your bank account number via email. Even if it is legitimate, there are other ways to send this information. Protect yourself by choosing a more secure method of communication.

What to do:

If something seems off, research it. If you get a weird email requesting something or asking you to click on a link, don’t assume it’s safe. If it’s from someone you know, ask them if they did send it.

If you are the one “sending,” check your Outbox or Sent folder. This is a good indication if the email came from you or someone you know.

Do You Have A Blind Spot In Your Security?

Security is only as good as its weakest link — one blind spot and a company can be compromised. It is important that each aspect of a company’s security is understood and up to date.

With the following best security practices, it can be better understood what to be aware of and how to better advance a company’s security.

From remote hackers, to in-person social engineering, and even your own e-mail, there are different methods of attacks and means of defense to maintain a company’s integrity.

Physical Security
The basic defense that predates IT security is physical security. Locked doors, restricted access, and watch patrol are some of the oldest methods to prevent aggressive physical security breaches.

Technology has only made physical security even better with security cameras, alarm systems, RFID badges, and biometric systems that identify a person from their physical being. Having the appropriate physical security is key to preventing and deterring break-ins and stolen items.

Social Engineering
With the right words and story, some people gain access to compromising areas and information that can give a company a real bad time.

Without a physical break-in or even a computer, social engineering works against human psychology, finding the vulnerabilities of staff and workers to trick and deceive their way past security. The best way to defend from this is to have a strong and easily understood security policy that educates staff and workers not give out credentials and access to unauthorized personnel.

Phishing
Billions of emails are sent out every day — promising a vacation, warning people about their bank accounts, or asking for charity — that are entirely design to steal or compromise a person or company. Phishing targets everybody, asking for credit card numbers, asking a person to sign in to their account on a fake site, or taking something in other ways.

Do not open emails or download email attachments with suspicious or unknown origins. If an email looks odd or is too good to be true, call or check a website directly to confirm if an email is legitimate.

Clicking or falling for phishing could end with a stolen identity, stolen money, or a locked PC or network demanding ransom money. Be smart and wise about checking emails.

Hackers
There are people that spend most of their day trying to break security codes, finding software loop holes, and other abstract means to force their way through digital security to gain illegal access to computers.

There are just as many (if not more) people working together to prevent such people from ever gaining access with new security measures and patches. To protect a PC or a company from hackers, always update your security definitions on Windows and antivirus software. Knowing what software to trust and what updates are needed are important ensuring digital security. We at Tech Experts make it our business to keep digital security online and updated at all times, so that no one has to fall victim to the unseen security threat.

Being aware of these different security risk and knowing how to defend from them can give a strong basis in understanding and learning in what needs to be done to keep a company or person secure.

Security is always evolving and changing, but having a modern understanding with security in place can make the difference between a secure environment and a risky work place that could come to a grinding halt when security is breached. Be safe, be smart, and be productive with good security.